US Passport Travel Advisories

Liechtenstein - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Liechtenstein. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Liechtenstein:

Last Update:  Reissued after periodic review without changes.

Liechtenstein - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Liechtenstein. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Liechtenstein:

Last Update:  Reissued after periodic review without changes.

North Macedonia - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in North Macedonia. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to North Macedonia:

Republic of X - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in Republic of X due to terrorism and civil unrest

Terrorist groups may conduct attacks with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities. Attacks may occur on remote islands which could lengthen the response time of authorities.      

A country-wide state of emergency is in effect. Security forces have been deployed to prevent public gatherings and anti-government demonstrations. Protests have also been reported where political prisoners are being held. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.  

If you decide to travel to Republic of X:

  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Republic of X.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist

Bangladesh - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in Bangladesh due to crime and terrorism. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Dhaka due to crime and terrorism.
  • Southeast Bangladesh, including the Chittagong Hill Tracts, due to crime and terrorism.

Violent crime, such as armed robbery, assault, and rape, is widespread.

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Bangladesh. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, restaurants, places of worship, and local government facilities. There is a possibility of terrorist attacks in urban areas despite the heavy police presence. 

Only adult family members, 18 years of age and older, are permitted to accompany U.S. government employees assigned to the U.S. Embassy in Bangladesh. U.S. government personnel in Bangladesh live, work, and travel under strict security guidelines and are prohibited from:

  • Traveling on foot (walking, running) and biking outside of designated areas and times;
  • Traveling via non-registered rickshaws outside designated areas and times;
  • Traveling via motorcycle or compressed natural gas autorickshaw (CNG) on public thoroughfares and sidewalks;
  • Visiting public establishments outside of designated areas and times; and
  • Attending large gatherings, including events at international hotels, without prior permission.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page. If you decide to travel to Bangladesh:

  • Avoid all demonstrations or political gatherings.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt. Flee to a safe area and report the situation to the local authorities.
  • Do not travel on foot, motorcycle, bicycle, rickshaw, compressed natural gas autorickshaw (CNG), or other uncovered means.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC) Crime and Safety Report for Bangladesh.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Dhaka

Dhaka’s crime rate is high, and crime increases dramatically at night. Urban crime can be organized or opportunistic, conducted by individuals or groups, and commonly includes fraud, theft, robbery, carjacking, rape, assault, and burglary.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Southeast Bangladesh

Travel is dangerous to the Khagrachari, Rangamati, and Bandarban Hill Tracts districts (collectively known as the Chittagong Hill Tracts) due to kidnappings and other security incidents. Political demonstrations, blockades, and violent clashes have occurred and are likely to continue. Prior approval from Bangladesh’s Ministry of Home Affairs Office of Public Safety is required if you plan to travel to the Chittagong Hill Tracts.

Sudan - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel to Sudan due to terrorism and civil unrest. Some areas have increased risk. Please read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • The Darfur region, Blue Nile state, and South Kordofan state due to crime and armed conflict.

Terrorist groups continue plotting attacks in Sudan, especially in Khartoum. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting foreign and local government facilities, and areas frequented by Westerners. Terrorists groups in Sudan have stated their intent to harm Westerners and Western interests through suicide operations, bombings, shootings, and kidnappings.

A state of emergency is in effect in Kassala and North Kordofan states, which gives security forces greater arrest powers. Arbitrary detentions, including of foreigners, have been reported across the country. Curfews may be imposed with little or no warning. The Sudanese government does not recognize dual citizenship and is likely to consider U.S.-Sudanese dual citizens Sudanese citizens only.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Sudan, as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization from the Sudanese government to travel outside of Khartoum. The U.S. Embassy requires U.S. government personnel in Sudan to use armored vehicles for official travel. Family members under 21 years of age cannot accompany U.S. government employees who work in Sudan.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Sudan:

  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or a power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, and the like.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Find a suggested list of such documents here.
  • Be sure to appoint one family member to serve as the point of contact with hostage-takers, media, U.S. and host country government agencies, and Members of Congress, if you are taken hostage or detained.
  • Establish a proof of life protocol with your loved ones, so that if you are taken hostage, your loved ones can know specific questions and answers to ask the hostage-takers to be sure that you are alive and to rule out a hoax.
  • Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them.
  • Erase any sensitive photos, comments, or other materials from your social media pages, cameras, laptops, and other electronic devices that could be considered controversial or provocative by local groups.
  • Leave your expensive/sentimental belongings behind.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Sudan.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

The Darfur States, Blue Nile State, and Southern Kordofan State – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violent crime, such as kidnapping, armed robbery, home invasion, and carjacking, is particularly prevalent in the Darfur region. Westerners are frequently targeted.

Tensions remain high between the government of Sudan and opposition forces and violence continues along the border between Chad and Sudan and areas that border South Sudan (including the disputed area of Abyei). Armed opposition groups are active in Central Darfur and parts of Blue Nile and South Kordofan states.

Zimbabwe - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in Zimbabwe due to crime and civil unrest.            

Violent crime, such as assault, carjacking, and home invasion, is common. Smashing the windows of cars with the intent to steal, which can harm the driver or passengers, is also common.

Local police lack the resources to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents.

Zimbabwe will hold general elections across the country on July 30, 2018. Due to heightened political tensions around the elections, acts of violence may occur at political rallies.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Zimbabwe:

  • Stay alert and avoid openly displaying cash.
  • Carry a copy of your passport and visa and leave originals in your hotel safe.
  • Stay away from political rallies, demonstrations, and crowds.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Keep travel documents up to date and easily accessible.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Zimbabwe.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Worldwide Caution - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

This latest update to the Department of State’s Worldwide Caution provides U.S. citizens with general information regarding terrorist activities, political violence, and criminal activity that transpire abroad, as well as specific recommendations on how to prepare for possible contingencies, receive information on breaking security events, and ensure that travelers can be contacted in an emergency. This version replaces the Worldwide Caution dated January 11, 2018.

As terrorist attacks, political violence (including demonstrations), criminal activities, and other security incidents often take place without any warning, U.S. citizens are strongly encouraged to maintain a high level of vigilance and practice good situational awareness when traveling abroad. When planning a trip and prior to departing the United States, American citizens should consult country-specific Travel Advisories and information pages on travel.state.gov.

Travelers are also urged to enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency. The Department uses these security messages to convey information about terrorist threats, security incidents, planned demonstrations, natural disasters, etc. In an emergency, please contact the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate or call the following numbers: 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 from other countries.

U.S. government facilities worldwide remain in a heightened state of alert. These facilities may temporarily close or periodically suspend public services to assess their security posture. In those instances, U.S. embassies and consulates will make every effort to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens. U.S. citizens abroad are urged to monitor the local news and maintain contact with the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.

Terrorist groups including ISIS, al-Qa'ida, their associates, and those inspired by such organizations, are intent on attacking U.S. citizens wherever they are. Extremists may use conventional or non-conventional weapons to target U.S. government and private interests. Terrorists are increasingly using less sophisticated methods, including the use of edged weapons, pistols, and vehicles as weapons, to effectively target crowds. Extremists increasingly aim to assault "soft" targets, such as:

  • high-profile public events (sporting contests, political rallies, demonstrations, holiday events, celebratory gatherings, etc.)
  • hotels, clubs, and restaurants
  • places of worship
  • schools
  • parks
  • shopping malls and markets
  • tourism infrastructure
  • public transportation systems
  • airports

In multiple regions, terrorists, guerrilla groups, and criminals seek to kidnap U.S. citizens to finance their operations or for political purposes. The Department also remains concerned that terrorists could again seek to down aircraft using concealed explosives or hijack commercial flights.

Private U.S. citizens should not travel to any country to participate in armed conflict. U.S. citizens are reminded that fighting on behalf of, or providing other forms of support to, designated terrorist organizations can constitute the provision of material support for terrorism, which is a serious crime that can result in penalties, including prison time and large fines. 

For further information:

Turkey - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel to Turkey due to terrorism and arbitrary detentions. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

Areas along the Turkey-Syria border and the southeastern provinces of Hatay, Kilis, Gaziantep, Sanliurfa, Sirnak, Diyarbakir, Van, Siirt, Mus, Mardin, Batman, Bingol, Tunceli, Hakkari, and Bitlis due to terrorism.

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Turkey. Terrorist organizations explicitly target Western tourists and expatriates for kidnapping and assassination. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Under the State of Emergency, security forces have detained tens of thousands of individuals, including U.S. citizens, suspected of affiliation with alleged terrorist organizations based on scant or secret evidence and grounds that appear to be politically motivated. U.S. citizens have also been subject to travel bans that prevent them from departing Turkey.

Participation in gatherings, protests, and demonstrations not explicitly approved by the Government of Turkey can result in arrest.

The U.S. government subjects its personnel in Turkey to certain security restrictions that are subject to change.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Turkey:

  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners, particularly at popular tourist locations in Istanbul.
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Stay at hotels with identifiable security measures.
  • Monitor local media and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Turkey.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Southeast Turkey and the Syrian Border – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Southeastern Turkey, including the provinces of Hatay, Kilis, Gaziantep, Sanliurfa, Sirnak, Diyarbakir, Van, Siirt, Mus, Mardin, Batman, Bingol, Tunceli, Hakkari, and Bitlis, is vulnerable to terrorist activities. Terrorist attacks, including suicide bombings, ambushes, car bomb detonations, improvised explosive devices, as well as kidnappings for ransom, shootings, roadblocks, and violent demonstrations have occurred in these areas.

Do not to travel to the large urban centers near the Turkish/Syrian border due to the continued threat of attacks by terrorist groups based in both Turkey and Syria. The government of Turkey prohibits border crossings from Syria into Turkey, even if the traveler previously entered Syria from Turkey.

The U.S. government has very limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens traveling in southeastern Turkey as the U.S. government restricts its employees from traveling to the region.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Colombia - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in Colombia due to crime and terrorism. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Arauca, Cauca (except Popayan), Chocó (except Nuquí), Nariño, and Norte de Santander (except Cucuta) departments due to crime and terrorism.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Several departments throughout the country due to crime and terrorism.

Violent crime, such as homicide, assault, and armed robbery, is common. Organized criminal activities, such as extortion, robbery, and kidnapping for ransom, are widespread. 

While the Colombian government signed a peace agreement with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) terrorist group, some dissident groups refuse to demobilize.

The National Liberation Army (ELN) terrorist organization continues plotting possible attacks in Colombia. They may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

U.S. government personnel cannot travel freely throughout Colombia for security reasons.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Colombia:

Arauca, Cauca, Chocó, Nariño and Norte de Santander Departments – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violent crime, including armed robbery and homicide is widespread. 

Terrorists groups are active in some parts. 

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens as U.S. government personnel cannot travel to these areas without permission from the Embassy’s Regional Security Office. When permitted, U.S. government personnel must travel to the cities of Popayan (capital of Cauca) and Nuqui (capital of Chocó) by air.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Several Departments throughout the Country – Level 3: Reconsider travel

Violent crime, including armed robbery and homicide, is widespread in the following departments. 

Terrorists groups are active in some parts.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Antioquia department north of Medellin
  • Caquetá department
  • Casanare department
  • Cesar department outside of Valledupar
  • Cordoba department outside of Montería
  • Guainía department
  • Guaviare department
  • Meta department
  • Putumayo department
  • Valle del Cauca department outside of Cali and Palmira area
  • Vaupes department
  • Vichada department

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens as U.S. government personnel cannot travel to these areas without permission from the Embassy’s Regional Security Office.

U.S. government officials and their families are generally permitted to travel to the major cities of Valledupar, Monteria, Cali, and Palmira by air.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Travel Restrictions for U.S. Government Personnel

U.S. government personnel must request advance permission for any travel outside of Bogota and the Atlantic Coast corridor from Cartagena to Santa Marta, and sometimes are required to travel in armored vehicles or carry personnel trackers. U.S. government officials and their families are generally permitted to travel to major cities only by air. They cannot not use inter- or intra-city bus transportation or travel by road outside urban areas at night. During daylight, they are permitted to use only the following routes:

  • Main highways between Bogota and Bucaramanga, and between Bogota and Ibague.
  • Highways between Manizales, Pereira, and Armenia and within the “coffee country” provinces of Caldas, Risaralda, and Quindío.
  • Highway 90 from Cartagena, through Barranquilla to Santa Marta.

South Sudan - Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to South Sudan due to crime and armed conflict.

Violent crime, such as carjackings, shootings, ambushes, assaults, robberies, and kidnappings is common throughout South Sudan, including Juba.

Armed conflict is ongoing throughout the country and includes fighting between various political and ethnic groups, and weapons are readily available to the population. In addition, cattle raids occur throughout the country and often lead to violence. Reporting in South Sudan without the proper documentation from the South Sudanese Media Authority is considered illegal, and any journalistic work there is very dangerous. Journalists regularly report being harassed in South Sudan, and many have been killed while covering the conflict there.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in South Sudan. U.S. government personnel in South Sudan are under a strict curfew. They must use armored vehicles for nearly all movements in the city, and official travel outside Juba is limited. Due to the critical crime threat in Juba, walking is also restricted; when allowed, it is limited to a small area in the immediate vicinity of the Embassy and must usually be conducted in groups of two or more during daylight hours. Family members cannot accompany U.S. government employees who work in South Sudan.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of South Sudan, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to South Sudan:

  • Exercise extreme care in all parts of the country, including Juba. Travel outside of Juba with a minimum of two vehicles along with appropriate recovery and medical equipment in case of mechanical failure or other emergency.
  • Avoid travel along border areas.
  • Avoid demonstrations and public gatherings. Even events intended to be peaceful can become violent.
  • Be aware that photography in public is strictly controlled and you are required to obtain authorization from the Ministry of Information before taking any photographs or video in public – including while inside a vehicle.
  • Monitor local/international news and consular messages.
  • Enroll your trip in the State Department's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).
  • Review your personal security plan and visit our page on travel to high risk areas.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, log-in information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs, if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Find a suggested list of such documents here.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization, or consider consulting with a professional security organization. Your plan should include sheltering in place, maintaining outside communication, and a personal evacuation plan via commercial means.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization so that they can monitor your safety and location as you travel through high-risk areas. This plan should specify who you would contact first, and how they should share the information.
  • Be sure to appoint one family member to serve as the point of contact with hostage-takers, media, U.S. and host country government agencies, and Members of Congress, if you are taken hostage or detained.
  • Establish a proof of life protocol with your loved ones, so that if you are taken hostage, your loved ones can know specific questions (and answers) to ask the hostage-takers to be sure that you are alive (and to rule out a hoax).
  • Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them.
  • Erase any sensitive photos, comments, or other materials from your social media pages, cameras, laptops, and other electronic devices that could be considered controversial or provocative by local groups.
  • Leave your expensive/sentimental belongings behind.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for South Sudan.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Malta - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Malta. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Malta:

Papua New Guinea - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in Papua New Guinea due to crime and civil unrest. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel To:

  • The Southern Highlands Province and Hela Province due to civil unrest.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Areas near the Panguna mine in Bougainville due to civil unrest.
  • The Highlands region due to the aftermath of a recent earthquake

Violent crime, such as gang-rape, carjacking, home invasions, kidnappings, and armed robberies, is common. Tensions between communal or clan groups may result in violence.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens outside of major population centers and in the southern part of Bougainville, Porgera Mine area, Lae, Mt. Hagen, Southern Highlands, and Hela Province as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization before traveling to those areas.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Papua New Guinea:

  • Avoid using local taxis or buses, known as public motor vehicles or PMVs.
  • Travel with guides from a reputable tour company, particularly if you plan to hike.
  • Avoid walking or driving at night.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Papua New Guinea.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

The Southern Highlands Province and Hela Province - Level 4: Do Not Travel

Recent government protests and tribal fighting have caused major destruction to government buildings and public infrastructure. Police have been unable to keep public order or prevent destruction of property. The U.S. Embassy has banned travel to these two regions for all Embassy employees until further notice.

Areas Near the Panguna Mine - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

The Autonomous Government of Bougainville has designated areas near the mine as “no go zones" due to the risk of violence and civil unrest. Bougainville police lack the resources to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents.

The Highlands Region - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

An earthquake has damaged infrastructure and disrupted local services.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Bosnia and Herzegovina - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in Bosnia-Herzegovina due to terrorism and land mines.

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Minefields and land mines are present throughout Bosnia-Herzegovina. While suspected hazardous areas are normally clearly marked, several people are killed or injured each year.  

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Bosnia-Herzegovina:

  • Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Remain on hard-surfaced roads and stay out of abandoned buildings due to risks from land mines.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Bosnia-Herzegovina.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Netherlands - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in the Netherlands. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to the Netherlands:

Denmark - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in Denmark due to terrorism.

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Denmark. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Read the Safety and Security section on the Country Information page.

If you decide to travel to Denmark:

  • Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Denmark.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Germany - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in Germany due to terrorism.

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Germany. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Germany:

  • Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Germany.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Cyprus - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions when traveling in Cyprus. 

  • Do not attempt to enter the United Nations buffer zone at any place other than a designated crossing point. Police and UN forces strictly enforce this restriction. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Cyprus:

Portugal - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Portugal. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Portugal:

Belarus - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

Exercise normal precautions in Belarus. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Belarus:

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